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Sexuality as a political, economic and cultural force - Part Two PDF Print E-mail
Life – Consciousness

ErrorweaSexuality as self-definition
Sexuality, in view of this personal and social importance which it has, becomes a means of self-definition and self-realisation for man. Up to a certain point, all the characteristics of man are definitive of his self - in the world, of course, of phenomena. However, the distortion here is crucial, and begins with the exaggeration and - through this - prevention of the emergence of other characteristics which he possesses which will potentially define man in a different way and more holistically.

 

Sexuality as such does not cause true organic relief nor does it bring about demythologising knowledge by means of experience - as would naturally happen with the fulfilment of desires, because here the desire is not purely sexual, but an instinct with a great many murky and alien superstructures built upon it. It could be said that it is a desire for desire, the aim being that we should stay exactly where we are, refusing the evolutionary process which always operates through abstraction or transcendence. Briefly put, pure desire leads to knowledge and constitutes a kind of abstraction or transcendence from the field in which it has been expressed towards a broader region of apprehension; whereas the rendering indirect of desire mythologises a field or a form of expression and becomes fixated on it, in an effort, by segmentation and analysis of the form to expand, replacing transcendence with this ritual and with the chaotic processes of this form, which are without real transcendence.

This state of excess, instead of allaying competition and reducing man's submission to his instincts, increases them. Nevertheless, exaggeration also leads to a saturation, apart from possible healthy rejection of the exaggeration, and can have unexpected consequences: either a host of other unforeseen distortions or a weakening of the contact of man with himself, and of his physical presence, since this becomes monomaniac, mono-organic, and one-dimensional, and becomes the vehicle only of instincts and not of a wholeness which combines nature and spirit.

One of the familiar side-effects upon man of his excessive centring on sexuality is the depression caused by being ignored and a sense of the futility of life after the age at which he is sexually active. The sense of futility, in its turn, intensifies the fear of death, which always lies behind all our psychological distortions. If, however, other centres had developed in the consciousness and sexuality had been in the correct proportion and position in our life, this depression because of neglect would not exist. On the contrary it would have laid the foundations for psychic balances in which the different ages of life would have their own inherent value and functionality - different from that of today, which limits man to poor imitations of life, instead of experience making life richer and youth more open to what is truly new. But the whole structure of our life is such that it mainly follows corporealised values, and so life declines in parallel with the body and the functional weakening of those values. This is an affront to our humanity and an involuntary self-underestimation, or, rather, self-devaluation - whatever we do about the retaining of youth, of sexuality, of false sociability, and alienation. 

Thus, this one-dimensional definition within the framework of sexuality puts man to death at a very early age, long before physical death. It murders the soul and the possibilities for evolution, because consciousness becomes fixated on the simulacrum of youth. This fact demonstrates that youth itself, in this way, is not true youth, since it does not possess either a tendency towards what is substantively new, that is, an openness towards the unknown sides of life, or constructiveness towards its future.

Over and above this, in order to investigate the depths of sexuality - whatever those are - one must escape from this limitation and become, in a certain way, an observer, not in an alienating way, but in terms of self-knowledge. Self-knowledge is the measure of proportion for all our characteristics. Otherwise, the relation between the individual and wholeness is lost, as is the relation between a function and the system to which it belongs. But what is it that, in the end, we are pursuing? That we should be our sexuality, or the whole of what is called 'self'? And we should not forget that we are not only that which is already known, but also that host of our capabilities which still remain unknown. This Unknown is not approached by desire or lust, but by means of abstractiveness.

Self-definition must be a system open towards the future and also include the abstract, the unknown, otherwise it becomes an idol, stagnation, moribundity. The abstract, however, that which is hidden in the future, as not being visible, contains within it the true seed of life, its cause. For that reason, any idolisation of the self through identification with ages or functions or anything else is not the self and idolisation as an obsession leaves no way out to evolution or happiness.

Instincts, though necessary, are achievements of the past and ought properly to operate with their natural cycles and true needs. The gigantisation of the instincts through distortion of consciousness and inadequacy of a holistic self-definition also harms the instincts themselves and makes them tools of anti-evolution - in reality, that is, it paralyses them as a signified of a function. In the end, if we centre self-definition on sex, we shall discover the restrictiveness of the form, which reflects our alienation from the experience of Being as a field of inwardness, wholeness, and transcendence operating not by means of desire but by means of abstraction on the basis of the economy of life.


You may also read:

SEXUALITY AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL FORCE - PART ONE -- Introduction -Sexuality as inequality and as a means
SEXUALITY AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL FORCE - PARE THREE -- Sexuality as an antidote to fear
SEXUALITY AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL FORCE - PART FOUR -- Sexuality as socialization
SEXUALITY AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL FORCE - PART FIVE -- Sexuality as freedom
SEXUALITY AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL FORCE - PART SIX -- Sexuality as seduction
SEXUALITY AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL FORCE - PART SEVEN -- Sexuality as seduction in marriage

 
Ioanna Moutsopoulou, Lawyer
Member of the Secretariat of Solon NGO


Photo from Wikimedia

 
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