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Return – The way of a new consciousness PDF Print E-mail
Life – Consciousness

Compass CaThe whole of our world, though it may be tightly interwoven with the body, is consciousness. We are and we define our identity through consciousness. Consequently, consciousness is the factor which sets aims and models.
If we do not take up a correct position towards consciousness, we will not take up a correct position towards anything. We will have no apprehension of the essential wager in the field of its causes. We shall be 'ignorant of the self and its house'.

In order to avoid 'cognitive' and mental confusion over what consciousness is, we can define it, initially, as a manner of reference or a modal reference. Thus we come close to a synthesis of Kant's approach,[1]  with Husserl's transcendental awareness and the spectral accentuation and nature of consciousness. But we keep the horizon open and with less binding commitment.

Self-governance and a binding field of error
However, in our quest for a field of our self-governance, we encounter an exceptionally binding field of error.
- To begin with, the consciousness itself develops in many fields and at many levels, or, in other words, dimensions, with a differing measure of proportion.
- Second, the question arises of what the consciousness itself is, and here many approaches have been developed.
- Finally, before we approach the issue of the method and aim, the question now arises of its relation with life, death, time, and the nature of being. This is a fundamental problem - it is the passage through the valley of nihilism and the torment of hopes, desires, and of identifications and needs supplied by idols and forms.

Freedom on condition of no-harm
Clearly, if there is ecstatic ('outside-of-itself') consciousness - without side-effects and without conventional commitments - this is a liberating exit route from degrading abrasions and pains, and anguishes. Such a consciousness can clearly be set as an initial aim, without having to give an account of itself to definitions (philosophical, social, psychological, medical, neurological, scientific, or fundamentalist).

We ourselves and our freedom are the inner/transcendental psychic and sociological fields of reference on condition of no-harm. The problem is, however, that we have a heavy heredity of attachment to idols and to workings of reference. The work to be done on the consciousness and the self is necessary and onerous for its transubstantiation.
If there is a field, a dimension, level, centre of consciousness, or, further, process, mode, or reference which is 'deeper' or 'higher' than restricting components, such as time, mode, or - ontologically - nihilistic commitments, then clearly it must be sought after and studied. This is the horizon of Freedom, Liberation, and Vindication of the consciousness and of identity in the part and the Whole.

The description of such a horizon has perhaps been attempted a number of times. A classic description of it in world literature is to be found in Jean-Jacque Rousseau's fifth Daydream:"If there is a state where the soul can find a resting-place secure enough to establish itself and concentrate its entire being there, with no need to remember the past or reach into the future [ … ] where time is nothing to it, where the present runs on indefinitely but this duration goes unnoticed, with no sign of the passing of time, and no other feeling of deprivation or enjoyment, pleasure or pain, desire or fear than the simple feeling of existence, a feeling that fills our soul entirely, as long as this state lasts, we can call ourselves happy, not with a poor, incomplete and relative happiness such as we find in the pleasures of life, but with a sufficient, complete and perfect happiness which leaves no emptiness to be filled in the soul.[2]"

Similarly, in Plato's Symposium, Diotima attempts to open up such a visionary horizon in the sense of archetypal beauty. We could lose ourselves in historical references, but the best that we can make is to 'try again', or 'do it again', as Kant[3]  said when he saw that the French Revolution was over. Perhaps in this way we should vindicate Saint Just's laconic words, to the effect that "the revolution will end in the perfection of happiness". Only this time it will be a matter of a revolution within us, of a more profound freedom and process of liberation; an inner revolution which will define the world afresh and will bring the will out of its tomb, together with the joy of love, on the ecstatic horizon of life, in the self, and the universal Oneness of Being.

The end of narrowness of consciousness, wretchedness, and degradation
Can we, then, overcome the certainty of the death of the form and go forth in acceptance of it and its necessity:
-- without fear, with joy and a profound sense of Being
-- without the nihilistic miasma which we ourselves have built up about the phenomena of life with raging desires and internal and external totalitarianisms.
If consciousness is the basis for the apprehension of Time, why is it not also the basis for its transcendence?

If consciousness has enclosed us in a shell of divisiveness and illusion like an 'insatiable beetle', why, then, can it not open up for us the Infinity of the Unified Self, of the One Self of the Cosmos, beyond tragic selfishness and its passions, in an ecstatic and liberating joy - without cause - in a gladdening relationship with a new and insuperable experience of beauty and abundance?

It would not be possible for such a consciousness to do harm because of management need, because it would not lose the sense of justice, nor intellectual sharp-sightedness or a substantive, effective methodical approach. These capabilities remain instinctive in a consciousness which resolves the fear of annihilation and abounds in motivation and relations with reality. It is more extensive, more vital, free, and liberating.

Has not the moment come, then, for the end of narrowness of consciousness, wretchedness, and degradation; is not also a revitalising consciousness a new starting-point for the curing of deeper problems, and of external problems of the planet?
Such a consciousness is not a part of individual, collective, and world problems. On the contrary, such a consciousness is a healer of problems and servant of the Existent Whole.
Since, even with the restrictive apprehension of current medicine and neuro-science, the brain and the nervous system are substantive vehicles of organic feedback and governance, we have nothing to fear from a new consciousness which is discerning and  communication-friendly.

A truly new consciousness is not one which is marked by an indiscriminate 'optimistic' totalitarian positivism as to the outcome of the crises and the trials of forms. It is clear that a consciousness which is 'consistently' optimistic and 'positive' in its thinking and invests in the indiscriminate 'all is well' of forms - ignoring the obvious dangers - usually conceals a fear, a hidden starting point, for our tragic selfishness and the tragedy of the nature of society and the world. 'Optimism' of this kind is often forced into mood swings, and has hidden in it bipolar disorder -mania and depression.
What we need is the transition of Iris[4]  from the world of transitory forms to a different consciousness, or a reference to existence. We need the Antahkarana or Rainbow of the Spirit.
Viewed in this dimension, we can, in the depth of the consciousness, approach, with new clarity, the will, the aim, and entity within the Unity of Reality.

Clearly, then, what is needed is work or, in other words, a correct asceticism of the consciousness, with joy, with a lively sense of the beauty of existence and with a new feeling for life. The depth of this consciousness consists of a profound concord with the sense of the Real, free from desires. In this way, there surfaces a profound feeling of peace.

At the same time, however, this depth is capable of refuting, is abstractive, and is not bound to inertia, or, above all, its desire. This abstractive depth is not bound, therefore, to form, and is the profound power to change which combines sensitive sharing and discerning freedom.

In this way, then, a profound peace brings profound changes, and prevents - qualitatively and silently - the consciousness itself from being self-enclosed and static.
With joy, that is, without desire, bulimia, impatience of knowledge and reference to results. Thus we shall discover the perspective of consciousness and relatedness.
Let those of us who are able undertake this on the path of Inner Sharing which is the Showing Forth of Being, and of the transformation of everyday life and of the idolised system.

To sum up:
-- Consciousness is the factor which sets aims and models. If we do not take up a correct position towards consciousness, we will not take up a correct position towards anything.
-- The time has come for a revolution within us, for a more profound freedom and process of liberation.
-- What is needed is work or, in other words, a correct asceticism, of the consciousness with joy, with a lively sense of the beauty of existence and with a new feeling for life. The depth of this consciousness consists of a profound concord with the sense of the Real, free from desires. In this way, there surfaces a profound feeling of peace.
-- With joy, without desire, bulimia, impatience of knowledge and reference to results. Thus we shall discover the perspective of consciousness and relatedness.

__________________
[1] Two typical sayings of Immanuel Kant could be quoted:
A. "Two things fill the mind with ever and increasing admiration and awe, the more often and steadily we meditate upon them: the starry firmament above and the moral law within."
B. "Act in accordance with those axioms which you would wish to be a more general law."
[2] Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, The Daydreams of a Solitary Walker [Greek edition], publ. I. Zacharopoulos & Co. OE, 1990, p. 88.
[3] A saying attributed to the philosopher Immanuel Kant which gives expression to his attitude towards the failure of the French Revolution. Kant was a supporter of the Revolution and one of the important thinkers of the Enlightenment. By it he was essentially saying that the failure of the Revolution is no reason for a return to the ancien régime, but, on the contrary, that there was a need for us to 'try again'.
[4] In Greek mythology, Iris (Ίρις) is the personification of the rainbow and messenger of the gods. She is also known as one of the goddesses of the sea and the sky. Read more: wikipedia.

Date of publication (in Greek): 15 November 2011

Yiannis Zisis, writer 

 
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